5 Tips to Improve Your Loading Dock Safety and Efficiency

Loading dock managers are relentless workers. They strive to meet ever-growing productivity targets and minimize downtime, invest in new material handling equipment, and hire more personnel. Their crew adheres to an aggressive loading and unloading schedule.

While productivity is top of mind, safety at the loading dock is often an afterthought. Managers are pressed into cutting corners with safety and overlook hazardous situations. But that doesn't have to be the reality for your loading dock.

How Dock Levelers Drastically Improve Loading Dock Safety

When a truck backs up to your receiving area, it’s unlikely the trailer will be at the exact same height as your loading dock. That gap between the trailer and your warehouse floor is a prime location for injury and equipment damage. 

Dock levelers, also known as edge of dock levelers or pit levelers, bridge the gap (in height and distance) between the floor and the trailer for smooth and safe loading and unloading. Learn about the most popular types of dock levelers used in the Bay Area, Central and Northern California, so you can choose the best dock leveler for your facility.

4 Signs Your Loading Dock Isn’t As Safe As You Think

A loading dock is a fast-paced and dangerous environment. Around 25% of all reported warehouse injuries occur on loading docks. Hundreds of near-misses precede each hazard. Forklift accidents cost employers an average of $48,000 per injury and $1,390,000 per death, according to the National Safety Council.

As a manager, putting safety first should be your top priority. In this article, we will cover four common and often overlooked signs of a hazardous loading dock.

Forklift Safety – A Guide for Operators

Forklifts and Electric powered jacks can cause serious injury or death to operators and pedestrians when not used properly. Below is a simple list of items operators should always do, and never do, when using the lift truck.

3 Most Common Forklift Accidents and How to Avoid Them

According to the Bureau of Labor and Statistics, nearly 100 workers are killed and another 20,000 are seriously injured in forklift-related incidents annually. Statistically, that means one of every ten forklifts in the US will be involved in an accident every year.

An OSHA study found 25% of forklift accidents are due to inadequate operator training, but what about the other 75%? In today’s article we’ll review the most common forklift accidents and how to prevent them through: proper training, safety equipment and proactive technology.

6 Simple Ways to Make Your Forklifts Safer


Forklifts cause 10 percent of workplace injuries in factories and warehouses, but many accidents (and lawsuits) can be prevented with the right forklift safety accessories. Combining safety equipment with pedestrian and operator safety training, clearly demonstrates your business takes a proactive approach to safety.

How Blue Spotlights and Red Zone Forklift Lights Improve Forklift Safety


More than 95,000 forklift accidents happen each year. Statistically, this means about 1 in 10 forklifts will be involved in some type of incident. Experts estimate 70 percent of forklift accidents can be prevented, and forklift safety lights are a simple way to make your workplace safer for both forklift operators and pedestrians.

Blue spotlights mounted on the front and/or rear of the lift truck alert pedestrians when a forklift is nearby, and how fast it’s approaching. The lights project a bright blue light about 8 feet in front of or behind the forklift, depending on where the light is mounted.

Red zone forklift lights illuminate areas on each side of the forklift pedestrians should avoid. By reminding workers to keep their distance, you can lower the odds of someone getting hit by the rear-end swing when the forklift turns.

Forklift Safety Matters: 7 Questions to Ask Your Service Provider


One of the riskiest mistakes a company can make is choosing a forklift service provider without asking about their safety record. Incidents and subsequent investigations can lead to costly fines, downtime, damage to your reputation and increased insurance costs.

The worst time to find out your forklift service provider has a poor safety record is after an incident. Take a proactive approach to safety by asking a few simple questions about their safety record and service technician training.

If you’re hesitant to ask, don’t be. Responsible operations that follow OSHA’s record-keeping requirements will know their safety stats and be happy to share them with you.

Common Forklift Operator Injuries and How to Prevent Them

Sitting for long periods, twisting into awkward positions and spending all day riding in a machine with no suspension are just a few reasons forklift operators find themselves with musculoskeletal and repetitive use injuries.

Lower back pain, musculoskeletal and repetitive strain injuries are some of the most common reasons for absenteeism and workers comp claims. According to a report on OSHA’s website:

Work-related musculoskeletal disorders are the most widespread occupational health hazard facing our Nation today. Nearly two million workers suffer work-related musculoskeletal disorders every year, and about 600,000 lose time from work as a result. Although the median number of lost workdays associated with these incidents is seven days, the most severe injuries can put people out of work for months and even permanently disable them. In addition, $1 of every $3 spent on workers' compensation stems from insufficient ergonomic protection. The direct costs attributable to MSDs are $15 to $20 billion per year, with total annual costs reaching $45 to $54 billion.

In today’s post, we’ll uncover the most common injuries forklift operators experience, and how operators, facility managers, and fleet managers can prevent them.

Warehouse Safety Audit: Checklist & Tips

Cal/OSHA requires every employer “to provide and maintain a safe and healthful workplace for employees .” Proof of this commitment includes periodic inspections:

...identifying existing or potential hazards in the workplace, and eliminating or controlling them. The frequency of these inspections depends on the operations involved, the magnitude of the hazards, the proficiency of employees, changes in equipment or work processes, and the history of workplace injuries and illnesses.

According to OSHA, the fatal injury rate for warehousing employees is higher than the national average for all industries. In today’s post, we’ll share our tips for conducting a warehouse safety audit - including the top hazards for warehouse workers and creating a warehouse safety checklist.

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