Common Forklift Operator Injuries and How to Prevent Them

Sitting for long periods, twisting into awkward positions and spending all day riding in a machine with no suspension are just a few reasons forklift operators find themselves with musculoskeletal and repetitive use injuries.

Lower back pain, musculoskeletal and repetitive strain injuries are some of the most common reasons for absenteeism and workers comp claims. According to a report on OSHA’s website:

Work-related musculoskeletal disorders are the most widespread occupational health hazard facing our Nation today. Nearly two million workers suffer work-related musculoskeletal disorders every year, and about 600,000 lose time from work as a result. Although the median number of lost workdays associated with these incidents is seven days, the most severe injuries can put people out of work for months and even permanently disable them. In addition, $1 of every $3 spent on workers' compensation stems from insufficient ergonomic protection. The direct costs attributable to MSDs are $15 to $20 billion per year, with total annual costs reaching $45 to $54 billion.

In today’s post, we’ll uncover the most common injuries forklift operators experience, and how operators, facility managers, and fleet managers can prevent them.

How to Get the Maximum Trade-In Value for Your Forklift

When it’s time for a new forklift, you naturally want a high trade-in value for your old equipment. Here are a few ways to ensure you receive top dollar:

How to Change the Propane Tank on an LP Forklift

Liquid propane (LP) Is a common forklift fuel type that requires extra caution when handling. The liquid propane inside the forklift’s fuel tank is highly pressurized at -40 °F. Only a small amount can severely damage eyes and skin. Liquid propane is also flammable and explosive.

Exposure to high concentrations of propane, even for a brief moment, can cause dizziness or even suffocation. In today’s post, we’ll cover how to safely change the propane tank on an LP forklift, including PPE (personal protective equipment) requirements.

Should You Buy an LP Forklift or an Electric Forklift?

 Both liquified petroleum (LP) forklifts and electric forklifts offer a cleaner, quieter alternative to gas or diesel-powered lift trucks. So which is better?

- Some applications, like food, pharmaceutical or underground facilities are required to use electric forklifts. Electric forklifts also have a lower cost of ownership in the long term.
- On the other hand, propane forklifts can be used indoors or outdoors, and changing tanks is easier than changing a forklift battery.

Read on to read a complete list of the major pros and cons of electric vs. propane forklifts.

Protect Your Forklift With an Anti Static Ground Strap

Ever wondered why there's a strap dragging on the ground underneath some forklifts? It’s an anti-static strap, also known as a ground strap.

Static electricity can be very harmful to a forklift. This may seem strange, but think about the circuit boards and computer chips that make up a modern lift truck. One good zap and your equipment could go brain dead. Forklift operators don’t like being shocked either!

It’s especially important to get a static strap for lift trucks with non-marking tires. Keep reading to find out how to correctly ground an electric forklift, or contact us to learn more. 

Forklift Capacity - How Much Do You Need?

If the
data plate on your forklift says its rated capacity is 10,000 lbs, that doesn't necessarily mean you can lift any load weighing less than 10,000 lbs. The load dimensions, placement, weight distribution of the load and any forklift attachments affect your lift truck's true maximum capacity.

Today's blog post will answer the questions:
- What is rated capacity vs. net/payload capacity
How much can a forklift actually lift?
- What is load center?
How to choose a forklift with the right capacity

Forklift Pricing - What You Need to Know

Buying a forklift, even a small forklift, is a big investment. Since it’s our goal to help customers find the right forklift for the right price, we wanted to share some insights about forklift pricing. Here are a few factors to keep in mind when estimating what you might pay for your next lift truck.

Different Types of Forklifts

Fleet managers have more choices than ever when it comes to material handling equipment. There are electric forklifts, internal combustion (ICE) forklifts, aerial lifts, order pickers, pallet jacks, reach trucks, scissor lifts...not to mention a  huge variety of
forklift attachments.

This article explains the different types of powered industrial trucks (Class I - Class VII) using the classifications recognized by OSHA. We’ll identify the advantages of each forklift type and the best applications for each one.

5 Signs Your Forklift Has Excessive Wear and Tear

Forklifts are designed to handle a few bumps and bruises, but every piece of equipment has its limits. Sometimes operators cause excessive damage to the lift truck due to lack of training, carelessness, or reckless driving.

In today’s post, we’ll review signs your forklift has excessive wear and tear, and when OSHA requires a forklift be removed from service.

1000 and 2000 Hour Forklift Service - Are They Necessary?

Customers sometimes ask, “do I really need to do the 1,000-hour or 2,000-hour service on my forklift?” It’s a fair question. The equipment is likely running great and taking it offline may seem like a waste of time and money.

There are a few reasons to do the manufacturer's recommended maintenance, not the least of which is OSHA’s requirement. Other reasons include: ensuring the lift is in safe operating condition and increasing the up time and longevity of your lift truck (or other material handling equipment).

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